Crohn’s disease

Crohn’s Disease is an autoimmune disease which can affect any part of the digestive system, from the mouth to the anus but is most commonly found in the last section of the small intestine (ileum).

Common symptoms can include diarrhoea, abdominal pain and the presence of blood and mucus in the stool. Over time, inflammation can damage sections of the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in complications which usually require surgery to remove the diseased tissue.

Certain medical therapies are used to treat and reduce the severity of flare-ups and bring patients back into remission. Others are used to try to reduce the number of flares suffered by a patient by keeping them in remission using maintenance therapies.

Unfortunately, there is still no cure for Crohn’s Disease.

Surgery is sometimes used to remove parts of the digestive tract in patients who do not respond to treatment with medicines. This is called a bowel resection.

In 2016, there were estimated to be 1.3m patients diagnosed with Crohn’s in the major pharmaceutical markets (Source: Decision Resources).

1.3m

patients diagnosed with Crohn’s in the major pharmaceutical markets